Tuesday, June 10, 2008

iAd


You would have had to have been very busy today to have missed the news from Mr. Jobs. Apple is going to release the new iPhone 3G on July 11th.

As I type this, fanboys all over the world are drooling at the thought. And soon, like Star Wars’ fans flocking to Episode 7, they will begin lining up at their local Apple Stores. But as this is an advertising blog, I would like to focus on one small aspect of the phenomenon.

If you go to Apple’s website, you will see a picture of the new phone and two simple statements. Twice as Fast. Half the Price. Let me repeat that. Twice as Fast. Half the Price. Now Apple could have chosen a lot of lines to sell their new phone. But they chose to focus on two very straightforward, very simple messages. No fluff. No wordplay. This is a textbook example of what should be done when your product has a strong selling point. Don’t cloud the message with a bunch of advertising-speak. Just clearly communicate the benefit.

Unfortunately, a lot of people in our business tend to think that all ads have to bury the message. You can’t just come right out and say what you’re product does. You have to somehow sneak it into the reader’s mind. Sometimes this is necessary. Like when you’re selling a parity product or when your product is the worse in its market.

But when your product can run circles around the competition, do not hesitate. Pick the fewest words, the cleanest font and the simplest background. Then climb to the top of the highest mountain you can find and deliver your message to the people.

2 comments:

dearjanesample said...

agreed.

And they don't even HAVE to do these bloody ads to sell them. The things will fly off the shelves like crazy. People are already trying to sell their current iphones .... just so they can buy the NEW one.

Joker said...

It's kind of maniacal if you ask me, but Jane has a point. Me, recently wrote a post of a client that didn't want to put a great offer in the title... lesson to be learned, never underestimate the idiocy of a client.